Thursday, 22 November 2018

Black Friday at PWR PT


main website to book or enquire

Tuesday, 20 November 2018

Adverts Abs

Advertisement Abdominals... Commercial Break Cut....Messages Muscle!

No need to move from the couch. Leave the TV on. Keep watching and 

Get into great shape!

Statistically speaking the average person spends 2 hours watching TV per day. On average there are commercial breaks every 10 minutes, each lasting 2 minutes. That adds up to 24 minutes of meaningless television time that could be put to good use.

Perform one set of exercise, to maximum effort, every time there is an advert break, and you will accumulate, on average, 24 minutes of vigorous physical exercise every day. That amounts to 168 minutes of exercise per week, which is more than enough to establish toned muscles, the flat stomach and the slender thighs you have always desired.

Living Room Lunge-Fest!

The list of exercises you can do in your living room is exhaustive. Here are a just few favourites that target the body parts that people would most like to tone up and trim down.

You don't need any equipment or timing devices. As soon as the advertisements begin, jump into action and kick on until your preferred show restarts. Simply return to back to your pizza, your cuppa, your milky bar buttons, or your family sized Galaxy slab, confident in the knowledge that you are burning all those calories away and activating muscle toning recovery.

Gogglebox Gains!

Dip - for the triceps,shoulders & chest
Dip - perform as many as you can in the advert break 

Record your performance over the course of a week. The more sets the better the results:
For example:
Attempt                  1     2      3      4      5      6
Reps completed     23   26    31


Crunch - core & hips
Press Up - arms chest & core
Alternate leg lunge - thighs & bum
These are just a few to get you started. Perhaps stick to two or three exercises each day, and change them every day on a rotation basis. Its up to you! Here's to you getting into great shape. I look forward to seeing your videos of you in action, performing your Advert Abs.

Practical health and fitness innovations brought to you by
Paul Richardson of www.pwrpersonaltraining.co.uk
Home visits personal training in central Lancashire, UK


Monday, 19 November 2018

Marathon training pointers

Written for a runner who can run 10km and has 6 months before the date of the marathon event


Flexibility
Complete a ten minute stretch after every run
Stretch - calf, hamstring, quads, glutes


Endurance
Bounce
The longer distances you run, over the weeks, the more you develop the “bounce” you create in the calves and legs. This saves muscle energy and improves your stamina for the long distances


Muscle endurance
With longer runs, you stimulate the muscles to ue energy and oxygen more efficiently. Your legs get used to the workload you put them through, over time. Gradually increasing the distance and time of runs, over the weeks, will see this improvement continue. This process takes months to develop, but you are on track if you are already up to 10 miles today (14/11/18).


Speed
During short runs of 3-5 miles, you can consider trying to improve your running speed. These short, “speed” runs, get your legs used to running a bit quicker. When it comes to the long runs, this will shorten the time it takes you to reach the end!
Speed runs are riskier and more stressful on the legs and heart, so short bursts of 30 seconds (“intervals”) of fast running, built into a steady run, are advised.


Repetition and Overload and Injury management
After a run, the body needs a period of time to heal and adapt. The brain and nervous system learns movement and skills very fast; within minutes. However, the muscles, organs and bones need a few nights to recover. If you know this, then you can plan your runs to allow for these recovery intervals.
Recovery of the tissues is directly related to the intensity of the run. For example, if you run 10 miles on Sunday, the longest distance to date, you will require a bit longer to recover. This could be muscular, joints, energy levels and just feeling tired in the days after.


If you manage the intensity of runs, so that your standard run is at a comfortable pace and not too long that you’re over-tired for days. So a comfortable 60-90 minute run should become a standard run you can do, say, every other day. For every 3 or 4 of these comfortable runs, you should inject a longer distance/time run, and plan a few days’ rest afterward.


This will culminate in running a 13 mile run (160 mins), perhaps one every 10 days, by December, with 3 or 4 short (60-90 minutes) runs in between.


For example, if you go out for a run on a Sunday morning at 7am, you’ll be back for breakfast before 10am.


Injuries
Within reason, injuries need to be treated with respect. If you have a niggle that feels worse that normal, probably best to not run on it and do some cycling or swimming. Otherwise, a niggle can turn to a sting, and it's a downward spiral from there! Rest is far better training!!!


Other Exercises
Keep other skills and muscle groups in use via the following:
Gym upper body strength resistance training: Zumba
Cycling ; Swimming


Recovery
Sleep is crucial to recovery
Perhaps consider training yourself to a structured bedtime procedure, that sees you tucked up an hour or so earlier. Perhaps read books instead of watching TV (and drop off quicker!)


Diet
The runner’s body needs to be saturated with water, energy (starchy carbs), proteins, vitamins and minerals. This is required in all meals, and careful planning is important before and after a run. The muscles and liver store a huge amount of glycogen, which is released steadily as you run. After 60 minutes+ of running, these stores are depleted and they will need replacing, before improvements can take place.


Pre-run
You will have some idea of what suits you best. Some prefer running on an empty stomach. Some need a good feed before hand.
Post-run
The body is drained of water glycogen, vitamins and minerals after a run.
During run
This is only an issue for runs beyond 60 minutes, for which only a drink is required.
Lots is made of these new energy gels that are isotonic re-fueling foods during a run. As you point out, some people find they upset their tummies when running. I imagine, from experience, that eating during a run is going to activate the stomach and disrupt the body somewhat. Ideally, some mild intake of sugary, mildly salty water, would assist and complement the running effort. Equally, on inspection of these “gels” nutritional content, there is little difference from that of a date or a fig. It depends what you want to carry.
During training runs, it might be worth trying a few of these things at the 45-60 minute mark, assuming you’re running for another hour.
Generally, water is the most important. Regular, small drinks will maintain hydration. Some people might prepare a drink with a very weak cordial and a pinch of salt. You will have plenty of runs to try these out in the months ahead!


Normal meals
Combine proteins with plants. That’s meat, fish, eggs, nuts, seeds, beans and peas, combined with salads, roots, beets. For extra energy add your starchy carbs, wholemeal where possible, pasta, rice, breads, potatoes etc.


Snacks
Snacks should include a protein (nuts, peas, seeds) with fruit or carrot sticks etc.


Water

Drink 6-8 pints of water a day, to literally saturate your body with water, and get your system used to being well hydrated. At first 6-8 pints water per day will make you need the loo a lot. But after a few days the body will get used to this new level of intake, and will ensure you are well hydrated for your run.

Wednesday, 24 October 2018

Karen - transformation

Karen joined our regular Monday evening Kettlebell Workout Class - held weekly at Vernons Sports Club in Penwortham - on the recommendation of her friend and class regular, Angela. Karen has been through tough times with cancer and sepsis, which made her very poorly. Karen was, understandably, very cautious when she started, and struggled with balance and movement. Paul kept a close eye on Karen throughout the class, with the help of classmate, Angela, who paired up with Karen to help and guide her through what must have been a large stride out of Karen's comfort zone.

This is what its all about in our kettlebell class. Its about mutual encouragement and support. There is no competition, just each person working towards their own improvements with the support and vibration of the other members of the class. Anyone is welcome to join in, and will soon feel part of the group.

From that tentative start in June, here's what Karen had to say, a few months later, in September.
"Thank you, Paul, the weekly kettlebell class is making me feel fitter and giving me confidence. That's the main thing and I thank you again for that. I haven't been able to do much for several years - due to illness and I was struggling even to walk just 12 months ago.
I have just checked and since my first class in June I have shed 12.25kg or 2 stones in weight. Your class has given me the boost of confidence I needed and thank you again."
I think every member of the class deserves a huge congratulations on helping Karen to settle in from a position of vulnerability to confidence. Well done all.

Rico's Kettlebell Workout Class
Mondays 6-7pm
Vernon Carus Sports Club, Factory Lane, Penwortham, Preston.

http://kettlebellpreston.weebly.com/
www.pwrpersonaltraining.co.uk